100 Bottles of Beer – Goin’ for the Burn

mexico-152015_640

A Home Brewer’s Personal Journey through His Craft – Part 25 Senores y Senoritas, Tres frio cervezas por favor, and make ‘em caliente! I remember the first time I ever tried a Mexican beer. It was a Carta Blanca and I remember commenting it tasted like beer with chilies. Well, this was long before I began really learning about beer. I know I actually tasted the spicy Mexican food I was eating along with the beer. I know of no true Mexican beer that contains chilies. Most Mexican beers are Pilsners or Vienna style lagers. The practice of serving Mexican beers with a wedge of lime is actually an American marketing idea and is rarely seen in Mexico outside of tourist areas. It may actually have originated as a means of sanitizing the rim of the bottle or to keep flies away from it. It also mimics the traditional salt and lime with a shot of tequila. For a unique treat, if you are ever at Margaritaville in Las Vegas, order a Loaded Corona. It is a bottle of Corona, which I normally do not care for at all, with a shot of Bacardi Limon rum poured into the space at the top of the bottle. It makes the first half of the bottle taste great, but eventually you do realize you are drinking Corona. But I digress, we are here to talk about chili beers. I believe it to be a purely American invention. Most chili beers are either a light ale or lager (pilsner) with chili juice, oil, or whole peppers added, typically jalapeno. They range from very mild to very hot but, to my palate, seem rather one dimensional, lacking something. So, I came up with the following, based on a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale recipe with a couple twists of my own. Chipotle Cerveza 10 lbs Northwest Pale malt ½ lb Cara-pils malt ½ lb 40L Crystal Malt 6 oz Piloncillo (Mexican unrefined cane sugar) 1 oz Homegrown Chinook whole cone hops (90 min) ½ oz Homegrown Nugget/Mt. Hood blend whole cone hops (20 min)Read More

100 Bottles of Beer – Enjoying the Fruits of Our Labor

Prague_Praha_2014_Holmstad_Mixed_berries_bær

  A Home Brewer’s Personal Journey through His Craft – Part 20   Well, here we are, once again and, before those of you who read the last installment ask; yes, my last brew was disaster free with no spillage or breakage, thank you very much. I will tell you all about it when we get there. But, for now, we are back on track and I am going to talk about fruit beers as promised. Those of you that have been with me since the beginning will recall back in part 5 I did a cherry stout   which did not turn out too well. Also, you may remember an Apricot Amber in part 9 which was made with apricot flavoring. This edition will be dedicated to beers made with fresh/frozen whole fruits. The first two of these came from More Homebrew Favorites by Karl Lutzen and Mark Stevens.  You may  recall we have visited several recipes from their first compilation, Homebrew Favorites, and also from their web site, Cat’s Meow. The first of these two is called Ripcord Raspberry Ale and is credited to Jerry Narowski of Derby, CT. My only changes are slightly increasing both the honey and the raspberries and using different yeast. Ripcord Raspberry Ale 1 lb 60L British Crystal malt 3.3 lb M&F light LME 3.3 lb M&F amber LME 1 lb 6 oz light clover honey 1 oz Northern Brewer whole cone hops (45 min) 1 oz Cascade whole cone hops (20 min) 1 oz Fuggles whole cone hops (5 min) ½ oz Fuggles hop pellets (5 min)Read More

100 Bottles of Beer – What’s The Worst That Could Happen?

1000px-Cologne_-_Panoramic_Image_of_the_old_town_at_dusk

A Home Brewer’s Personal Journey through His Craft – Part 19 This edition was originally written in July, 2010 Hello again fellow home brewers and beer geeks. It has been a while since we last got together to discuss our favorite subject, beer. When we last adjourned we had 32 brews left on our journey and I indicated we would discuss fruit     beers this time around. Well, scratch that idea for now. I feel compelled to tell a tale of my most recent brewing experience of  just this last week. It had been nearly a year since I had last had the opportunity to brew a beer, although I had brewed up a very unique mead and a disappointing hard cider in the meantime. What? Mead? Cider? Yeah, yeah, yeah, that will be a different story. I had been satisfying my brewing   Jones by relating these tales to you, my faithful readers. I had decided to brew a Kolsch. Kolsch is a style of pale ale specific to the city of Cologne, Germany. Legally, according to the German government, there are only about two dozen breweries in the Cologne region that can use the name Kolsch. A very simple, basic explanation of the style is that it is a pilsner  Read More

100 Bottles of Beer – Brewin’ “Beer at Home”

joker

A Home Brewer’s Personal Journey through His Craft – Part 18 Hello again fellow brewers! We still have 37 beers on the shelf so let’s get started by taking down four from Andy at Beer at Home.   You may recall that at this point in the journey Beer at Home is now my home brew shop of choice since Highlander Home Brew closed. The following “kit” recipes came from the monthly specials that Beer at Home mailed out at that time, which was 1999 – 2001. As previously reported, Beer at Home is still going strong with two locations in Englewood, CO and     Westminster, CO; both suburbs of Denver. The big news is that, in 2009, Andy and Matt took the leap from brewing great beers to distilling amazing spirits, all right here in Colorado. Their newest endeavor, DownSlope Distilling, was off and running, producing some of the finest distilled spirits, vodka, rum, and whiskey in Colorado, the Rocky Mountains and the world. I have had the pleasure of sampling several of their fine spirits courtesy of their sales rep in the Colorado Springs area, Rick. Check them out at beerathome.com and downslopedistilling.com.                Read More

100 Bottles of Beer – I Know “Beans” About Stout

Cacao Beans

  A Home Brewer’s Personal Journey through His Craft – Part 17 Welcome back, fellow brewers. This time around we are going to visit the dark side:  Stout!  Specifically a very unique and original stout I came up with. It is based on the Double Black Hook recipe we discussed in part 9 of our journey, but with a twist. You may recall the Double Black Hook was my attempt (very successful, I might add) to make a clone of Redhook Brewing’s Double Black Stout which was a rich stout brewed with Starbuck’s coffee. This is basically the same recipe with a couple   changes to the malts and hops and increasing the honey. I also used a different blend of Starbuck’s coffee. The most unique change is the   addition of vanilla beans. I call this creation, Three Bean Stout, in reference to the coffee beans, vanilla beans, and cocoa beans from which the Baker’s chocolate is made. I made this twice, first as a partial mash with extracts and later as an all-grain. I will share both recipes. Three Bean Stout 3 lb M&F Extra Dark DME 3 lb M&F Wheat DME 3 lb Clark’s raw unfiltered wildflower honey ½ lb British chocolate malt ½ lb American 120L crystal malt ½ lb German Munich malt ½ lb American Vienna malt ½ lb American Victory malt 1 oz Galena hop pellets (60 min.) 1 oz Northern Brewer hop pellets (30 min) 1 oz Willamette hop pellets (5 min) ¼ tsp Irish Moss (15 min)Read More